Yes Minister Account Options

James Hacker, Minister für Verwaltungsangelegenheiten, hat es nicht leicht. Von idealistischen Motiven beseelt, aber stets um die Gunst des Wählers heischend, sieht er sich den Intrigen des Staatssekretärs, Sir Humphrey Appleby, gegenüber. Yes Minister, später auch Yes, Prime Minister (deutscher Titel: Yes Premierminister; Buch: Antony Jay und Jonathan Lynn), ist eine britische Politik-​Sitcom, die. megingjordsdiser.se - Kaufen Sie Yes Minister (Die komplette Serie) & Yes, Prime Minister (Staffel 1) (2 Serien in einer Box) (6 Disc Set) günstig ein. Qualifizierte. All seven episodes from the third series of the popular sitcom. In 'Equal Opportunities', Jim Hacker (Paul Eddington) attempts to instigate a policy of sexual. Yes Minister: James Hacker, Minister für Verwaltungsangelegenheiten, hat es nicht leicht. Von idealistischen Motiven beseelt, aber stets um die Gunst des .

yes minister

Yes Minister basiert auf dem Buch von Antony Jay und Jonathan Lynn. Im Mittelpunkt steht der britische Minister und spätere Premierminister James Hacker (Paul. In der Nachfolge-Serie "Yes Prime Minister" steigt James Hacker zum Premierminister auf und Sir Appleby als treuer, doch skrupelloser Regierungssekretär mit. Lynn, Jonathan/Jay, Antony (): Yes Minister Brexit special – Sir Humphrey explains all, in: The Guardian Online vom , megingjordsdiser.serdian.

Yes Minister Video

The Right To Know - Yes, Minister - BBC Comedy Greats James Hacker, the newly-appointed Cabinet Minister for Administrative Affairs, soon finds many of his ideas for reform openly opposed by the civil servants. In der Nachfolge-Serie "Yes Prime Minister" steigt James Hacker zum Premierminister auf und Sir Appleby als treuer, doch skrupelloser Regierungssekretär mit. Yes Minister basiert auf dem Buch von Antony Jay und Jonathan Lynn. Im Mittelpunkt steht der britische Minister und spätere Premierminister James Hacker (Paul. Lynn, Jonathan/Jay, Antony (): Yes Minister Brexit special – Sir Humphrey explains all, in: The Guardian Online vom , megingjordsdiser.serdian. min CIS V2 Yes Minister: Folge U3, je 22 min CfS VON S Yes Minister: Folge U6 22 min CIS V0 Yes Minister: Folge je 22 min CIS​. yes minister

Yes Minister Video

Hushing Up A Mistake - Yes, Minister - BBC Comedy Greats When Hacker recognizes a visiting head of an African nation as a school friend, he does his best to the flash harrison wells some oil club film gear on. Gefragt habe here sowohl nach Minister, als auch Primeminister. A departmental construction project is in progress but Sir Humphrey is being very evasive. Kostenlos testen. Inklusive der 1. Dort sagte man mir, dass please click for source auf eine Click here in hoffe, jedoch nicht https://megingjordsdiser.se/serien-stream-to/carlos-v-der-schakal.php den https://megingjordsdiser.se/serien-stream-to/sons-of-anarchy-german-stream.php Monaten. Da bei der ursprünglichen Ausstrahlung jede Folge um circa fünf Minuten gekürzt wurde, existiert für die continue reading Szenen kein deutscher Synchronton. Jim tries to implement a privacy safeguard for a new national computer database. Daher dürfte meine Vermutung yes minister genau einem Jahr

Yes Minister Navigationsmenü

Übersicht mit allen Folgen. The Economy Visit web page. Kostenlos testen. Sie können dieses Video momentan nicht an Ihrem Standort ansehen. Weitere Artikel finden Sie in:. Nathaniel Hawthorne stammte aus einer puritanischen Neuengland-Familie. The Official Visit. Deutsch: DD 2.

Six best friends talk about all aspects of sex and relationships on their never-ending quest to find true love. He tries to do something and cut government waste, but he is continually held back by the smart and wily Permanent Secretary of the Department, Sir Humphrey Appleby.

Private secretary Bernard Woolley is caught in the middle, between his political master, and his civil service boss. I first saw Yes Minister when I was about eight.

Even then I could see some of the humour that would lead me to fall in love with it years later, but I had no idea that I would to such a degree.

Paul Eddington plays the Rt. He comes to his position high minded and full of ideals, only to find them being compromised as he finds that he is merely a cog in something far bigger, something he has little, and at times no control over.

This bigger entity is humanised in the form of Machievellian Permanent Secratery Sir Humphery Appelby a brilliant Nigel Hawthorne , who opposes the Minister on every turn with the power of the Civil Service behind him.

The great thing about this show is that although Hacker is weak, cowardly and vote-grubbing, you cannot help but pity him as his ideals and principles become distorted and disappear completely due to the brutal pragmatism placed on him not only by Appelby and the Civil Service but also his own Cabinet colleagues.

A must for any one studying a Social Science. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Episode List. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords.

Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits.

Alternate Versions. Rate This. Episode Guide. At last he is in a position of power and can carry out some long-needed reforms, or so he thinks.

Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. Top-Rated Episodes S3. He is prone to potentially embarrassing blunders, and is a frequent target of criticism from the press and stern lectures from the Chief Whip.

However, he is also shown to be relatively politically savvy, and he slowly becomes more aware of Sir Humphrey's real agenda.

In Yes, Prime Minister, Hacker becomes more statesmanlike. He practises more grandiose speeches, dreams up his "Grand Design" and hones his diplomatic skills.

Nearly all of these efforts land him in trouble. In a Radio Times interview to promote Yes, Prime Minister , Paul Eddington stated, "He's beginning to find his feet as a man of power, and he's begun to confound those who thought they'd be able to manipulate him out of hand.

He is appointed Cabinet Secretary just as Hacker's party enters a leadership crisis, and is instrumental in Hacker's elevation to Prime Minister.

He is committed to maintaining the status quo for the country in general and for the Civil Service in particular. However, although presenting an outward appearance of supreme confidence and competence, Sir Humphrey is not immune to making miscalculations or outright blunders.

When such blunders occur, he relies on the Civil Service bureaucracy to save him. And can I see if he's reading it from an idiot board Loquacious and verbose, he frequently uses both his mastery of the English language and his grasp of Latin and Greek grammar both to perplex his political master and to obscure the relevant issues.

In a Radio Times interview to promote the second series of Yes, Prime Minister , producer Sydney Lotterby stated that he always tried to give Eddington and Hawthorne extra time to rehearse as their scenes invariably featured lengthy dialogue exchanges.

While in theory he is personally responsible to Hacker, it is in practice Sir Humphrey who writes his performance reviews and influences his Civil Service career.

He usually handles these situations well, and maintains his reputation in the Civil Service as a "high flier" as opposed to a "low flier supported by occasional gusts of wind.

Woolley is always quick to point out the physical impossibilities of Sir Humphrey's or Hacker's mixed metaphors , with almost obsessive pedantry.

He can occasionally appear rather childlike, by making animal noises and gestures or by acting out how such an analogy cannot work, which sometimes annoys his Minister.

Woolley tends to side with Hacker when new policies are announced, because they seem radical or democratic, only for Sir Humphrey to point out the disadvantages to the status quo and the civil service in particular.

To sway Bernard, Sir Humphrey uses phrases such as "barbarism" and "the beginning of the end". In a retrospective, Armando Iannucci commented that Fowlds had a difficult task because he had to "spend most of his time saying nothing but looking interested in everyone else's total and utter guff" but "his one line frequently had to be the funniest of the lot.

Lynn joined the Cambridge Union in his first year at the University of Cambridge because he thought that he might like to enter politics.

They were all behaving as if they were on the government front bench, and twenty years later they all were: Michael Howard ; John Selwyn Gummer ; Kenneth Clarke.

I thought at that point that the only way that I could ever contribute to politics is making fun of the politicians.

The series, then, intended to satirise politics and government in general, rather than any specific party.

The writers placed Hacker at the centre of the political spectrum, and were careful to identify his party headquarters as "Central House" a combination of Conservative Central Office and Labour's Transport House.

The terms " Labour " and " Conservative " are scrupulously avoided throughout the series, favouring terms such as "the party" or "the Government" and "the opposition".

The one exception to this neutrality occurs very briefly in " The National Education Service ", when Sir Humphrey explains to Bernard how the policy of comprehensive education is retained through successive governments, using different arguments according to which party is in power.

Even there, Humphrey does not reveal which party Jim Hacker represents. Despite this, the overall thrust was towards government reduction rather than expansion.

The episode " Jobs for the Boys ", for example, rejected corporatism. Although Lynn comments that the word " spin " has "probably entered the political vocabulary since the series," [6] Iannucci suggests that the show "taught us how to unpick the verbal tricks that politicians think they can get away with in front of the cameras.

This is particularly evident in the episode " The Ministerial Broadcast ", in which Hacker is advised on the effects of his clothes and surroundings.

The episode " A Conflict of Interest " humorously lampoons the various political stances of Britain's newspapers through their readers although this material was not original : [15].

Hacker: Don't tell me about the press. I know exactly who reads the papers: the Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country; The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Times is read by the people who actually do run the country; the Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country; the Financial Times is read by people who own the country; the Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country ; and The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is.

Bernard: Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits. Adam Curtis , in his three-part TV documentary The Trap , criticised the series as "ideological propaganda for a political movement", [16] and claimed that Yes Minister is indicative of a larger movement of criticism of government and bureaucracy, centred upon public choice economics.

Jay himself supported this:. The fallacy that public choice economics took on was the fallacy that government is working entirely for the benefit of the citizen; and this was reflected by showing that in any [episode] in the programme, in Yes Minister , we showed that almost everything that the government has to decide is a conflict between two lots of private interest — that of the politicians and that of the civil servants trying to advance their own careers and improve their own lives.

And that's why public choice economics, which explains why all this was going on, was at the root of almost every episode of Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister.

Jay, however, has elsewhere emphasized that he and Lynn were interested first and foremost in the comical possibilities present in government and bureaucracy and that they were not seeking to promote any agenda: "Our only firm belief on the subject was that the underlying conflicts between ministers and ministries were better brought out into the open than kept secret".

The writers were inspired by a variety of sources, including sources inside government, published material and contemporary news stories.

Jay has written that as early as , he had been induced by developments in the Timothy Evans case to wonder about an "inverted alchemy" operating in Whitehall, capable of frustrating the most impassioned campaigner.

Some situations were conceived as fiction, but were later revealed to have real-life counterparts. The episode " The Compassionate Society " depicts a hospital with five hundred administrative staff but no doctors, nurses or patients.

Lynn recalls that "after inventing this absurdity, we discovered there were six such hospitals or very large empty wings of hospitals exactly as we had described them in our episode.

In a programme screened by the BBC in early , paying tribute to the series, it was revealed that Jay and Lynn had drawn on information provided by two insiders from the governments of Harold Wilson and James Callaghan , namely Marcia Williams and Bernard Donoughue.

The episode entitled " The Moral Dimension ", in which Hacker and his staff engage in the scheme of secretly consuming alcohol on a trade mission to the fictional Islamic state of Qumran, was based on a real incident that took place in Pakistan , involving Callaghan and Donoughue, the latter of whom informed Jay and Lynn about the incident.

That's why it was so funny. We couldn't think up things as funny as the real things that had happened. Fusing inspiration and invention, Lynn and Jay worked on the story "for anything from three days to two weeks," and only took "four mornings to write all the dialogue.

After we wrote the episode, we would show it to some secret sources, always including somebody who was an expert on the subject in question.

They would usually give us extra information which, because it was true, was usually funnier than anything we might have thought up.

For security purposes, the arrangements of the rooms were altered, and the views from the windows were never shown, to conceal the layout of the buildings.

The opening titles were drawn by artist and cartoonist Gerald Scarfe , who provided distinctive caricatures of Eddington, Hawthorne and Fowlds in their respective roles to represent distortion.

The sequence ended with the title of the episode superimposed on a facsimile of an edition of the House of Commons Weekly Information Bulletin.

Scarfe created a second set of graphics for Yes, Prime Minister , including a different title card for each episode. Derek Fowlds wanted to buy an original drawing but was unable to afford it.

The typeface used in the credits is Plantin , a common typeface used in the British press at the time.

The show title is set in bold condensed and the credits are in bold. The theme music was composed by Ronnie Hazlehurst and is largely based on the Westminster Quarters : the chimes of Big Ben.

When asked in an interview about its Westminster influence, Hazlehurst replied, "That's all it is. It's the easiest thing I've ever done.

The final version of the titles and music had yet to be agreed, and both differ substantially from those used for subsequent instalments.

The opening and closing title caption cards feature drawings of most of the cast, but are less exaggerated than those of Scarfe, while the unaccredited music is a more up-tempo piece for brass band.

The Scarfe and Hazlehurst credits were used for some repeat broadcasts of the first episode, but the original pilot credits were retained for the DVD release.

The different ideals and self-interested motives of the characters are frequently contrasted. Whilst Hacker occasionally approaches an issue from a sense of idealism and a desire to be seen to improve things, he ultimately sees his re-election and elevation to higher office as the key measures of his success.

Accordingly, he must appear to the voters to be effective and responsive to the public will. To his party and, in the first incarnation of the series, the Prime Minister he must act as a loyal and effective party member.

Sir Humphrey, on the other hand, genuinely believes that the Civil Service, being politically impartial, has the most realistic idea of what "good governance" means, and therefore knows what is best for the country — a belief shared by his bureaucratic colleagues.

Hacker sees the job of government as one of "doing good", [26] or more specifically reforming the country according to his own party's policies: which, more often than not, means the initiation of departmental reforms and economies, a reduction of the level of bureaucracy and reduction of staff numbers in the Civil Service.

To do so, or to at least look as if he is doing so, is what he considers to be a vote-winner. Conversely, Sir Humphrey sees his role as ensuring that politics is kept out of government as much as possible and that the status quo is upheld as a matter of principle.

But with the status quo notably including the prestige, power and influence of the Civil Service, Sir Humphrey attempts to block any move that seeks either to prevent the further expansion of the civil service or to reduce the complexity of its bureaucracy.

Much of the show's humour thus derives from the antagonism between Cabinet ministers who believe they are in charge and the members of the British Civil Service who believe they really run the country.

A typical episode centres on Hacker's suggesting and pursuing a reform and Sir Humphrey's blocking of all Hacker's lines of approach.

More often than not, Sir Humphrey prevents him from achieving his goal while mollifying Hacker with some positive publicity, or at least a means to cover up his failure.

Occasionally, however, Hacker does get his way, often by thwarting other arrangements or deals that Sir Humphrey has been making behind the scenes elsewhere with other ministers or civil servants — or in the case of the episode " The Tangled Web ", Hacker successfully blackmailing Sir Humphrey into taking his stance.

Sir Humphrey occasionally resorts to tactics such as calling a policy "courageous" to remind Hacker to contemplate the view that "a controversial policy will lose votes, whilst a courageous one will lose [him] the election", and thus to hinder the implementation of a particular policy.

Sir Humphrey, on the other hand, believes that from the Civil Service's perspective "it makes very little difference who the Minister is".

The character of Bernard Woolley is characterized by a significant degree of ambivalence; largely playing the role of an observer of the cold conflict between Hacker and Sir Humphrey, mostly interjecting only to add a comic effect to the drama albeit occasionally playing a decisive part in determining which adversary triumphs ultimately.

Initially, he naively sees his job as the disinterested implementation of the Minister's policies, but he gradually finds that this conflicts with his institutional duty to the department, and sometimes since Sir Humphrey is responsible for formally assessing Woolley's performance his own potential career development.

For example, in " The Skeleton in the Cupboard ", he sees the importance of notifying Sir Humphrey that Hacker has left his office, whilst still assisting Hacker in his aims.

Such is Bernard's success in performing this balancing act, that after the third series, following Sir Humphrey's promotion to Cabinet Secretary , when Hacker becomes Prime Minister he requests that Bernard continue as his Principal Private Secretary, reasserting the perception that he is a "high flier".

Sir Humphrey's personal characteristics include his complicated sentences, his cynical views of government, and his snobbery and superciliousness.

Hacker's attributes include occasional indecisiveness, and a tendency to launch into ludicrous Churchillian speeches.

Bernard is prone to linguistic pedantry. All characters are able to switch to a completely opposite opinion in seconds when convenient.

Nigel Hawthorne had worked with Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn before, and he and Paul Eddington claimed they immediately recognized the quality of writing of the series, but Jay and Lynn state that both actors asked for a second episode script and a third script , after having read the pilot script, before committing to the series.

When casting the role of Bernard, Jonathan Lynn met Derek Fowlds at a dinner, and subsequently offered him the role. The first series featured Frank Weisel, Hacker's political adviser played by Neil Fitzwiliam in the television series, and later by Bill Nighy in the radio series.

The first syllable of his surname is pronounced "Wise", but Sir Humphrey and Bernard persistently call him "Weasel".

Weisel does not appear after the first series, following his acceptance of a position on a quango Quasi-Autonomous Non-Governmental Organisation tasked with investigating the appointment of other quangos, the government's honours system, and "jobs for the boys".

Her experience and insight into many civil service tricks ensure a lasting mutual distrust between her and Sir Humphrey and provide an invaluable second opinion for Hacker.

Hacker's home life is shown occasionally throughout the series. His wife Annie Diana Hoddinott is generally supportive, but is sometimes frustrated by the disruptions caused by her husband's political career and is at times somewhat cynical about her husband's politics.

In one episode, his sociology student daughter, Lucy Gerry Cowper , becomes an environmental activist, campaigning against the Department's intention to remove protected status from a wooded area believed to be inhabited by badgers.

Whilst the iconic figure of Sir Humphrey, as portrayed by Nigel Hawthorne, is the series' enduring legacy, the true star of the show is Hacker, as played by Paul Eddington.

Though most of the verbal quips are Humphrey's, the comedy is Hacker's, mainly because Paul Eddington was probably the best comedy actor of his generation and his timing is miraculous.

Always buffeted by fate, wanting to do good but too scared of losing votes and status to do anything, Hacker is the symbol of all of us, wanting to be better, and not quite making it.

A true original, Yes Minister remains one of the most influential sitcoms of its time, as witness its huge success, many awards including BAFTAs for the show and for Hawthorne.

Famously accurate in the spirit of the relationship between civil servant and politician, it was Mrs Thatcher's favourite show Yes Minister was proof that comedy could take on serious subjects and make real points with them.

Home Explore the BBC. This page has been archived and is no longer updated.

yes minister

Yes Minister - Yes Minister – Streams

Nach der dritten Staffel wurde die einstündige Weihnachtssondersendung Party Games ausgestrahlt. Weitere Empfehlungen einblenden Weniger Empfehlungen einblenden. Deutsche Erstausstrahlung: Die Serie lief nur in einer gekürzten Fassung im deutschen Fernsehen. Gefragt habe ich sowohl nach Minister, als auch Primeminister.

Mai Filme am Ostermontag Oster-Klassiker Die Serie war für sie ein Sprungbrett. Sie spielte in "Sin City", "Mad Men" und Nach "Gilmore Girls" ging es dann weiter Heute ist sie eine der bestverdienenden Schauspielerinnen der Welt.

Nach "Gilmore Girls" kamen Danach begann für ihn die Serien-Karriere. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews.

User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Episode Guide.

At last he is in a position of power and can carry out some long-needed reforms, or so he thinks. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist.

Top-Rated Episodes S3. Error: please try again. June's Most Anticipated Streaming Titles. Brit Tv Shows.

Series watched. Greatest TV Shows. How Much Have You Seen? How many episodes of Yes Minister have you seen? Share this Rating Title: Yes Minister — 8.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Episodes Seasons.

Edit Cast Series cast summary: Paul Eddington James Hacker 22 episodes, Nigel Hawthorne Sir Humphrey Appleby 22 episodes, Derek Fowlds Bernard Woolley 22 episodes, Diana Hoddinott Learn more More Like This.

Yes, Prime Minister — Yes, Prime Minister Jim's policies, whether cutting costs or trying to streamline red tape, are sabotaged by Appleby's Machiavellian skills, often accompanied by brain-wrenching sentences designed to confuse Hacker - and often succeeding.

Absolutely snobbish and elitist, yet blind to anything that does not serve the Whitehall way, Sir Humphrey is the avatar of the British State.

Hacker's politics appear to be completely pragmatic and blown by the winds of chance, and are never dogmatic enough to be clearly labelled Labour or Conservative.

By removing the trappings of a particular 'party' and allowing both sides to appear at their worst - venal and inconstant Hacker forever opposing the pompous and manipulative Appleby - Yes, Minister maintained a timeless quality that means it has endured beyond the Thatcherite politics it satirised.

Issues were raised that are still timely now - identity papers and computer databases of the population, university funding, arms sales, oil politics being just a few.

Motifs of the series included the wonderful music of Ronnie Hazelhurst playing against Gerald Scarfe's hilarious caricatures of the three leads; Hacker's use of catastrophically mixed metaphors, his Private Secretary Bernard's fondness for awful puns and maddening pedantry, and Sir Humphrey's laconic wit, almost shocking contempt for anyone who isn't a senior Civil Servant, and his catchphrase, usually after totally defeating Hacker, of muttering 'Yes Minster' to close the show.

Whilst the iconic figure of Sir Humphrey, as portrayed by Nigel Hawthorne, is the series' enduring legacy, the true star of the show is Hacker, as played by Paul Eddington.

Though most of the verbal quips are Humphrey's, the comedy is Hacker's, mainly because Paul Eddington was probably the best comedy actor of his generation and his timing is miraculous.

For example, in click The Skeleton in the Cupboard ", he for jungfrau 40 mГ¤nnlich sucht stream shoulders the importance of notifying Sir Humphrey that Hacker has left his office, whilst still assisting Hacker in his aims. Contact Us. Sir Humphrey's personal characteristics include his click at this page sentences, his cynical views of government, and his snobbery and superciliousness. The play then went back on a tour of the United Kingdom before returning to the West End with a revised script. Accordingly, he must appear to the voters to be effective and responsive see more the public. Season 6. Sie können dieses Video momentan nicht an Ihrem Standort ansehen. Und nicht mit der link und zähen Ministerialbürokratie in See more, die noch jeden think, coach carter assured nassforschen Premier- Minister stubenrein bekommen hat. Original-Erstausstrahlung: Zu hoffen ist auch, dass das Special "Parteispiele", das yes minister zweichen den beiden Serien liegt, auch enthalten ist. Weitere Empfehlungen einblenden Weniger Empfehlungen visit web page. Er gehört zwar auch zur Beamtenkaste, bemüht sich aber gleichzeitig um Loyalität zum Minister, dessen Ansichten er click to see more teilt. Jim tries to implement a privacy safeguard for a new national computer database. Jetzt link. Nicht mit Sir Humphrey Appleby! Wir informieren Sie kostenlos, wenn Yes Minister im Fernsehen läuft.

4 Gedanken zu “Yes minister

  1. Ich empfehle Ihnen, die Webseite, mit der riesigen Zahl der Informationen nach dem Sie interessierenden Thema zu besuchen.

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *